Tag: disability

Research – employment and workforce

Working from the Margins: Trade Unions and the challenge of precarious work in Malawi (February 2019 – June 2019) This is an ongoing collaborative research project between the Malawian Congress of Trade Unions, and academics at Heriot-Watt University and the University of St Andrews. The funding is initially for a networking trip for colleagues from the Malawian Congress of Trade Unions (MCTU) to the UK. Together we have identified key research priorities regarding precarious work […]

Trust and therapeutic relationships

Trusting experts and epistemic humility in disability Ho, A. (2011) International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics Abstract: It is generally accepted that the therapeutic relationship between professionals and patients is one of trust. Nonetheless, some patient groups carry certain social vulnerabilities that can be exacerbated when they extend trust to health-care professionals. In exploring the epistemic and ethical implications of expert status, this paper examines how calls to trust may increase epistemic oppression and […]

Getting things changed: disabled people’s organisations and co-production

‘Getting Things Changed’ was a large multi-centre programme of UK based research in Disability Studies, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council between 2015-2018. It was led by a team at the University of Bristol, with Disability Rights UK, the National Development Team for Inclusion and partners in three other universities. The report highlights the successes and challenges of a co-productive approach – refer particularly to the executive summary and introduction, and to the detail of chapter 9 (page 40) […]

Innovation for Active Communities

Leonard Cheshire will use a £1million loan from Nesta’ Innovate To Save Programme, to develop and scale their IAC project across Wales. Innovation for Active Communities (IAC – formerly known as Prime Members Club) offers adults receiving direct payments a way to pool their one-to-one support hours. These can then be used against a variety of group-based social activities at varying times of the week, reducing the number of carers needed to support the activities and […]