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Tag: power

What is co-design and co-production (by Kelly Ann McKercher)

Kelly Ann McKercher, who works in Australia as Beyond Sticky Notes, has put together this BRILLIANT overview of what co-production and co-design are.  We can’t recommend it highly enough. It’s got helpful diagrams and downloadable posters, and a lot of wisdom – it talks about power, relationships, and curiosity, as well as a scale of approaches from transactional to transformational (look below for a snippet), and plenty more. Covers all aspects. Honestly we love it […]

Considering power relationships in co-design

Alysha Baratta writes on the InWithForward blog, about the balance of power in a co-design process: https://inwithforward.com/2019/07/panacea-for-power Power isn’t some quantifiable unit that can be split 50/50. First, our positionality means we wield power in ways beyond our control. As a trained human geographer, I think about how my fixed or culturally ascribed attributes (race, class, gender) situate me in the world and next to people I co-design with. I also think about life experiences […]

Doing things differently can yield unexpected results

Another story courtesy of Tracy Bodle from Kirklees: A facilitator was running a programme for people out of work and advertised a “learn about beekeeping” series of sessions.  She arrived at the first one and opened with: “I’m assuming you’re all here because you’re interested in learning about beekeeping. I am too. So how are we going to learn about it?”. After the initial shock and confusion (and indignation!),  someone in the group suggested they should […]

The perfect playground

By Anne Moore in The Guardian “The Land is close to the original adventure playgrounds that started in Denmark during the second world war. The first was created by the landscape architect Carl Theodor Sørensen after watching children playing on bombsites, building and demolishing. It opened in Copenhagen in August 1943 and was known as askrammellegepladsen, which translates as “junk playground”. Nothing was static or expensive – it was all wood, rope, empty vehicles, bricks and […]